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A sabbatical is more than a vacation, it’s a sacred human ritual for what you want to do differently in life—even if for just a little while.

Use your sabbatical to:

Explore and get inspired.

Invest in yourself and your future.

Create a blueprint for change.

Make or enhance meaningful connections.

4 things we know are true...

1

Sabbaticals are peak life experiences.

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We created the Sabbatical Project after repeatedly hearing that extended leave is a transformative experience for those who are able to take it. Interviewees describe the impact of their sabbatical on their lives in the same category as the birth of their child and their wedding day. We want more people to experience such a life-changing opportunity.

“The sabbatical gave me a once-in-a-lifetime chance to question my reality and my path, and to give myself permission to really think about what I can do to prioritize things in my life. I can’t imagine living 30 more years without those lessons.”

From conquering burnout to focusing on yourself, realign on what matters. 

Most sabbaticals aren’t by choice. In fact, two-thirds of sabbatical-takers are thrust into their time off by work or personal crises—the death of a loved one, a toxic relationship at work or at home, job termination, or a personal health issue.

The impact of this dynamic is a vicious cycle: it takes longer to disconnect and heal before they can truly reap the benefits of time off.

“I always had my computer with me, even on the weekends. I loved what I was doing—I loved my team and believed in the mission—but there really wasn’t a time where I was just disconnected. I wouldn’t have said I was burned out, but that’s because I was too close to it all.”

2

Sabbaticals help to conquer burnout.

3

Sabbaticals spark profound, positive changes. Our research uncovered that sabbaticals provide a safe space to heal, explore, create and make changes.​

Alumni have left their traditional career tracks to dedicate themselves to macro causes such as social justice, the environment and transforming our diets. Many more have used the time for its own sake, savoring a brief respite from routine life, and tweaking priorities upon return to create a more sustainable and fulfilling life.

Before

“Work became my identity—in New York, ‘what do you do?’ is the question after, ‘what’s your name?’ That’s how people define you, and that’s how you sometimes start to define yourself. The idea of success and failure and self-worth… they were all linked to my job, title, and salary.”

After

“We are more than the sum of what we achieve and accomplish in this world, and we are more than our productivity, and if you don’t have a good sense of who you are and what your value is to the world, then I think you’re missing some core part of yourself.”

4

Sabbaticals benefit everyone.

Our research is clear: the benefits of sabbaticals accrue to anyone who takes them, regardless of their socioeconomic status. But the majority of sabbatical-takers do so on their own time, and at their own expense.

The prospect of going without a paycheck—let alone benefits—is impossible for many, even with years of planning and savings. We’re working to make sabbaticals available to everyone, through corporate advocacy, policy-making, and even sabbatical stipends for those in need. Join our movement for equitable extended leave.

Ready to start your journey?

Get Inspired

Sabbaticurious? Explore sabbatical stories, read our research, or checkout the upcoming book release.

Get Started

Committed and ready to begin your journey? Connect with a cohort or get one on one coaching & mentorship.

Get Involved

For advocates and alumni, tell us your stories, mentor others, participate in our research, or help fund the project.

Get Access to the Field Guide

Discover your Sabbatical Archetype, your Sabbatical Readiness Score, and learn best practices (and what to avoid) from our research on sabbatical alums.

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